PTSS 16-12 Participants Study Lessons Learned from the 2008 Mumbai Attacks

A few nice Cell Phone News images I found:

PTSS 16-12 Participants Study Lessons Learned from the 2008 Mumbai Attacks
Cell Phone News
Image by GCMCOnline
By GCMC Public Affairs Office

GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, Germany (July 20, 2016) – Indian army Col. (Ret.) Behram Sahukar, adjunct professor for the Program on Terrorism and Security Studies, gave a lessons-learned presentation on the 2008 Mumbai attacks July 20.

The 2008 Mumbai attacks were a series of attacks that took place in November 2008, when 10 members of Lashkar-e-Taiba, an Islamic militant organisation based in Pakistan, carried out a series of 12 coordinated shooting and bombing attacks lasting four days across Mumbai.

Sahukar first talked about the terrorist objectives such as disrupt the then ongoing India-Pakistan peace process and refocus international attention on the “liberation” of Kashmir from India.

He talked about the attackers’ profile, targets and tactics, and the Indian response actions such as the internal measures. He also talked about the impact of the attacks on the Indian economy, tourism, investments and Muslims, and on the India-U.S. strategic cooperation, India-Israel defense partnership and on international counterterrorism cooperation.

Sahukar concluded his presentation with 11 lessons learned such as the need to improve methods to interfere with selected cell phone and satellite phone coverage without affecting security forces’ communications. Another lesson learned was to upgrade coastal surveillance and maritime/port security and intelligence gathering to safe guard island territories.

Other lessons learned included: upgrading analysis and updating information and layout of lucrative ‘soft’ targets; training and equipping Special Counter Terrorism forces to operate in modern Urban Jihad setting and ensuring interoperability with other security forces; conducting regular Emergency Action and Counter-Terrorism Intervention Drills to include support services and private security agencies; and, enforcing international obligation by States to act forcefully against terrorist activities by ‘non state actors’ based on their territory.

The most important lesson learned, said Sahukar, was that a multi-faceted international cooperation and coordination to pre-empt future Mumbai-style terrorist attacks.

Sahukar served in the Parachute Regiment (Special Forces) of the Indian army for 34 years and is a combat veteran of the 1971 India-Pakistan War. He holds a Master’s Degree in Defense Studies, and an Advanced Master’s Degree (MPhil) in International Studies (Middle East/South Asia).

More PTSS 16-12 photos can be found on the Marshall Center Photo Gallery.

Read more about PTSS 16-12 online at: www.marshallcenter.org/mcpublicweb/en/nav-itemid-fix-news… (Marshall Center photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Carrie Fox)

PTSS 16-12 Participants Study Lessons Learned from the 2008 Mumbai Attacks
Cell Phone News
Image by GCMCOnline
By GCMC Public Affairs Office

GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, Germany (July 20, 2016) – Indian army Col. (Ret.) Behram Sahukar, adjunct professor for the Program on Terrorism and Security Studies, gave a lessons-learned presentation on the 2008 Mumbai attacks July 20.

The 2008 Mumbai attacks were a series of attacks that took place in November 2008, when 10 members of Lashkar-e-Taiba, an Islamic militant organisation based in Pakistan, carried out a series of 12 coordinated shooting and bombing attacks lasting four days across Mumbai.

Sahukar first talked about the terrorist objectives such as disrupt the then ongoing India-Pakistan peace process and refocus international attention on the “liberation” of Kashmir from India.

He talked about the attackers’ profile, targets and tactics, and the Indian response actions such as the internal measures. He also talked about the impact of the attacks on the Indian economy, tourism, investments and Muslims, and on the India-U.S. strategic cooperation, India-Israel defense partnership and on international counterterrorism cooperation.

Sahukar concluded his presentation with 11 lessons learned such as the need to improve methods to interfere with selected cell phone and satellite phone coverage without affecting security forces’ communications. Another lesson learned was to upgrade coastal surveillance and maritime/port security and intelligence gathering to safe guard island territories.

Other lessons learned included: upgrading analysis and updating information and layout of lucrative ‘soft’ targets; training and equipping Special Counter Terrorism forces to operate in modern Urban Jihad setting and ensuring interoperability with other security forces; conducting regular Emergency Action and Counter-Terrorism Intervention Drills to include support services and private security agencies; and, enforcing international obligation by States to act forcefully against terrorist activities by ‘non state actors’ based on their territory.

The most important lesson learned, said Sahukar, was that a multi-faceted international cooperation and coordination to pre-empt future Mumbai-style terrorist attacks.

Sahukar served in the Parachute Regiment (Special Forces) of the Indian army for 34 years and is a combat veteran of the 1971 India-Pakistan War. He holds a Master’s Degree in Defense Studies, and an Advanced Master’s Degree (MPhil) in International Studies (Middle East/South Asia).

More PTSS 16-12 photos can be found on the Marshall Center Photo Gallery.

Read more about PTSS 16-12 online at: www.marshallcenter.org/mcpublicweb/en/nav-itemid-fix-news… (Marshall Center photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Carrie Fox)

morning commute in Tokyo, mobile phones
Cell Phone News
Image by anthroview
As the age of mobile flip phones and iPod players has given way to smartphones, it seems that every other person on this morning commute on the Chuo Line in central Tokyo was staring at or plugged into a handheld device, whether for music, news or talk, gaming, watching video, reading messages or reading a book. It did not seem to matter if the person was standing or seated, male or female, young or old, so prolific were the pricey wonders of silicon chips and hard glass screens with long lived batteries.